Attractions in Inveraray

Things to do in the Wider Area

Gardens of Argyll

Local Businesses

 

Things to do in the Wider Area

Cruachan Power Station - The Hollow Mountain

Situated amongst some of Scotland's most beautiful scenery, lying deep within Ben Cruachan is one of the country's most amazing engineering achievements. Hidden deep within the mountain of Ben Cruachan on the shores of Loch awe is Cruachan Power Station.Here, a short distance from Oban, you can discover one of the hidden wonders of the Highlands. A power station buried one kilometre below the ground.
At its centre lies a massive cavern, high enough to house the Tower of London! Here enormous turbines convert the power of water into electricity, available to you in your home at the flick of a switch.

 

Kilmartin Glen

Kilmartin Glen is one of the world’s most significant archaeological landscapes. The Glen’s unique archaeological remains and rich natural heritage were the inspiration for the creation of Kilmartin Museum, which opened in 1997.
Sites include the largest collection of standing stones in Europe, stone circles and rock art dating back thousands of years.
www.kilmartin.org

 

Carnasserie Castle

Carnasserie Castle is a roofless ruin today, but it was once a fashionable residence incorporating many of the latest Renaissance influences. It was the home of the first Protestant Bishop of the Isles, Master John Carswell, and its design is befitting of a man of his stature.
The castle is an accomplished piece of architecture, laid out as a single building integrating both a five-storey tower house and a hall range. Its masonry matched the design, with finely-carved features throughout.
From the parapets there’s a magnificent view down to Kilmartin Glen, which is home to a range of marked rocks, cairns and standing stones, some of which are visible from the tower.

 

Dunadd Fort

Clamber to the top of a spectacular rocky outcrop fort that’s been occupied since the Iron Age.
Dunadd Fort rises proudly from Moine Mhor – the ‘great moss’ – an expanse of bog that carpets the southern end of Kilmartin Glen. It was home to a fort 2,000 years ago, and a royal power centre of Gaelic kings in the 500s to 800s AD.
Below the mighty fort site are some extraordinary features carved into the rock, including two human footprint shapes – similar to a pair found at Clickimin Broch.

 

Cruise Loch Lomond

Cruise Loch Lomond offers the opportunity to experience the serenity of the ‘bonnie banks’ from the comfort of one of seven vessels in the fleet. Whether entertaining clients or colleagues, considering having a wedding on Loch Lomond, or celebrating that special occasion with a private party in this unique venue.
www.cruiselochlomond.co.uk

 

Ocean Explorer Centre, Oban

A FREE indoor visitor attraction near Oban to explore the science behind our oceans.

 

Inverawe Smokery and Fisheries

Inverawe has something for everyone, be it fishing, finding out how salmon is smoked, exploring the many trails and tracks, feeding the fish, trying our new play area, browsing through the shop, or enjoying our delicious food in the Smokery Café.
www.inverawe-fisheries.co.uk

 

Crinan Canal

The canal, which opened in 1801, takes its name from the village of Crinan at its western end. Approximately nine miles (14 km) long, the canal connects the village of Ardrishaig on Loch Gilp with the Sound of Jura, providing a navigable route between the Clyde and the Inner Hebrides, without the need for a long diversion around the Kintyre peninsula, and in particular the exposed Mull of Kintyre.[1]

 

Isle of Seil

Seil (Scottish Gaelic: Saoil) is one of the Slate Islands, located on the east side of the Firth of Lorn, 7 miles (11 km) southwest of Oban, in Scotland.

 

Kintyre Peninsula

Kintyre is in the southwest of Argyll and Bute. The peninsula stretches about 30 miles (48 km), from the Mull of Kintyre in the south to East Loch Tarbert in the north. The area immediately north of Kintyre is known as Knapdale.
Kintyre is long and narrow, at no point more than 11 miles (18 km) from west coast to east coast, and is less than two miles wide where it connects to Knapdale. The east side of the Kintyre Peninsula is bounded by Kilbrannan Sound, with a number of coastal peaks such as Torr Mor. The central spine of the peninsula is mostly hilly moorland. The coastal areas and hinterland, however, are rich and fertile. Kintyre has long been a prized area for settlers, including the early Scots who migrated from Ulster to western Scotland and the Vikings or Norsemen who conquered and settled the area just before the start of the second millennium.
The principal town of the area is Campbeltown (about 5.5 miles (9 km) by road from the Mull), which has been a royal burgh since the mid-18th century. The area's economy has long relied on fishing and farming, although Campbeltown has a reputation as a producer of some of the world's finest single malt whisky. Campbeltown Single Malts include the multi-award-winning Springbank and the rejuvenated Glen Scotia.
Walk on some of the most remote, stunning beaches at Westport.
And of course made renowned by Paul McCartney.